SciX 2017

October 8 - 13, 2017

Grand Sierra Resort

Reno NV

Leading researchers will convene to present their cutting edge developments in analytical sciences, instrumentation and unique applications. The meeting hosts a world class exhibition, presentations from leading scientists, educational courses, and many networking opportunities. For more information, see the SciX website.


Poster abstract submissions deadline: July 31.

SciX 2017 Conference Topic Areas

SciX traditionally focuses on the following topical areas. However, presentations in every area of analytical chemistry are accepted and encouraged.

Agricultural & Food Chemistry
Mass Spectrometry
Analytical Chemistry
Microfluidics
Atomic Spectroscopy
Microscopy
Bioanalysis
Nanotechnology
Chemical Imaging
Near Infrared Spectroscopy
Chemometrics
National Defense and Security
Chromatography
Pharmaceutical Analysis
Education
Process Analytical
Electrophoresis & Related Techniques
Raman Spectroscopy
Environmental Analysis
Stand-off Sensing
Fluorescence Spectroscopy
Surface Plasmon Resonance
Forensic Sciences
Surface Science
Infrared Spectroscopy
Terahertz Spectroscopy
Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy
Vibrational Spectroscopy
Low-Field NMR
Women & Diversity in Chemical Sciences

Keynote Speaker

Janie Dubois
University of Maryland, JIFSAN
Chair of the Laboratory Capacity Working Group at the World Bank's Global Food Safety Partnership

Meeting Organizers

Jason Dwyer
University of Rhode Island
Beaupre Center
Kingston, RI
jason_dwyer@uri.edu
Dr. Jason R. Dwyer is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Rhode Island. His research is at the intersection of bioanalytical chemistry and nanofabrication, with an emphasis on exploration, development, and application of thin-film nanofluidic platforms. Chemically tailored nanopore single-molecule sensors are a prominent focus area for fundamental and applied studies. Before joining URI, Dr. Dwyer completed his Ph.D. in physical chemistry at the University of Toronto, and postdoctoral fellowships in biophysics and applied biophysics at the Max Born Institute (Berlin) and the University of British Columbia. Dr. Dwyer is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award.
Darwin Reyes-Hernandez
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Gaithersburg, MD
darwin.reyes@nist.gov
Dr. Reyes is a biomedical engineer at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). He received a B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Puerto Rico, and an M.S. in Applied Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University. After completing his Ph.D., where he worked in the areas of toxicology and environmental analytical chemistry, he was awarded with a National Science Foundation (NSF) Postdoctoral Fellowship to work at Imperial College, London, U.K. There he developed microfluidic devices for 2D separations and analog computing using glow discharge.  Some of the areas he is currently working are: development of microfluidic systems with electronic manipulation and measurement for cell-based assays and drug screening, on chip electronic flow measurement sensors, cell-substrate biomimetic interfaces with tunable elasticity and thin- flexible wearable sensors.