Dielectrophoresis

In 1951, Herbert A. Pohl, a research scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory, Anacosta, D.C., made history by publishing the first journal article on Dielectrophoresis [1]. This electrokinetic transport mechanism “is becoming an important scientific direction with exponential growth. With over 300 papers published yearly in the past three years, it is becoming one of the main pillars of the field of microfluidics. New and effective dielectrophoretic modes and techniques are being constantly developed and reported in the literature. The great flexibility and potential that dielectrophoresis has to offer, make it suitable for applications in a wide variety of fields, with important and attractive advantages over traditional bench scale systems” [2]. As an example of the growing importance of Dielectrophoresis, two special issues focused on Dielectrophoresis were published by the journal Electrophoresis in September 2011 [2, 3].

The AES Electrophoresis Society is pleased to launch the premier online resource for dielectrophoresis and the multitude of specialty sub-topics. We have invited the innovators from a wide range of dielectrophoretic modes: FFF-DEP, contactless DEP, curvature-induced DEP, Insulator Gradient DEP, 3D carbon electrode DEP, and others to write the following articles. Our aim is to provide a unique resource with the latest advancement of the DEP field. These experts often use AES application foci to review the fundamentals, then outline the latest scientific developments. Content is expanding and we welcome suggestions for additional focus topics. Please email minerick@mtu.edu

References
  1. Pohl, H., The Motion and Precipitation of Suspensoids in Divergent Electric Fields, Applied Physics 1951, 22, 869-871.
  2. Lapizco-Encinas, B. H., Foret, F., Dielectrophoresis 2011 – Part I, Electrophoresis 2011, 32(17), 2231-2231.
  3. Lapizco-Encinas, B. H., Foret, F., Dielectrophoresis 2011 – Part II, Electrophoresis 2011, 32(18), 2401-2401.

Volume 32, issue 17
Electrophoresis
Volume 32, issue 18
Electrophoresis